• Mon, Nov 30 2009

30 top uses for Chopsticks in the studio

The other day, when I was un-weaving some mis-begotten narrow bands (see posting here: Frogging) I grabbed a chopstick to help me in the separating of warp and weft strands.

This made me chuckle, as I realized how fond I am of chopsticks and how much I use them in the studio.

photo by Noreen Crone-Findlay copyright

photo by Noreen Crone-Findlay copyright

I thought:

‘Okay….I use chopsticks

in the studio ALL THE TIME

so….

how many ways

to use a chopstick

in the studio

can I think of ?

(There are 6

variations in the pic

to the left….)

Here’s my list of ways to use chopsticks in the studio:

1] Since this all started with me using a chopstick as an instrument of de-construction in unravelling weaving, that’s the top of the list.

2] Chopsticks can be carved into great weaving hooks. I posted a video about how to do this: Carve a weaving hook

3] Speaking of weaving: I really like to use chopsticks as shed sticks in weaving:  Weaving with yarn on the potholder loom

4] You can sand chopsticks, sharpen them, glue a bead on, and you have got knitting needles.

5] You know that weaving hook you carved? Well, you can carve a crochet hook with a chopstick, too.

6] In the pic above, a chopstick is supporting a spindle. I use chopsticks all the time to hold things up for photos. Handy!

7]  The spindle the photo support chopstick is holding up is made with: Yep…. a chopstick.

8] Cut a circle of wood, drill a hole in the center, and pop a chopstick in it: Voila! Perfect for holding small cones of thread or yarn.

9] Paint it black and hold a shawl closed with it

10]  Sharpen the point, and sand it, and it works well as a loop lifter for large spool knitters

11]  Ooooooh yes…. mustn’t forget this one: Chopsticks are excellent backscratchers!

12] And, what if you want to conduct your favorite piece of music? A chopstick is a fine little baton :D

13]  I work with charts all the time, so I lay a chopstick above the row I am working on to mark my place

14]  I wouldn’t recommend a chopstick as a bookmark, but a magazine place holder is within the realm of possibilities

15]  Have you ever had a small object roll tantalizingly close to the edge, but just out of finger range under a bookcase? Well, a chopstick is perfect for flicking the elusive object out of hiding.

16]   Floppy plants can be given a little backbone by supporting them with a chopstick

17]  You can make an impromptu Lazy Kate by poking  holes on each side of a small box and putting balls of yarn onto the chopsticks that are inserted into the holes in the box. Instant assistance in plying in handspinning.

18] You can stir paint with a chopstick

19] You can stir your tea with a chopstick, but not after you have stirred paint with it

20] You can wind yarn on it, like a mini nostepinne (How? Nostepinne how to link)

21] I make tatting shuttles, and when I am varnishing them, I need ways to suspend them. Chopsticks are great for supporting them as they dry

22] Do you need a peg for anything at all? Cut one from a chopstick!

23] Swirl the detergeant around in the pail with a chopstick before you place dirty fleece in it to soak.

24] Lift yarn or roving out of dye pots with chopsticks.

25] If you have long hair, you can twirl it around, and put a chopstick through it to hold it out of the way. I don’t have long hair anymore, so this one doesn’t really count on my list.

26] You can use chopsticks to make doll arms and legs

27] Chopsticks make great support sticks for shadow puppets

28]  You can use chopsticks instead of dowels to hang small wall hangings and tapestries

29] You can use chopsticks to make wrapped God’s Eye ornaments: Tutorial

30] And, perhaps, most important of all: You can eat your pad thai or sushi with chopsticks. ;)

So,  can you think of other ways to use a chopstick in the studio?

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  • Elizabeth

    Very interesting. Enjoyed reading about the chopsticks. it gave me some ideas to use. Thanks.

  • http://www.hankeringforyarn.com Noreen Crone-Findlay

    Thanks, Elizabeth. I am pleased that it inspired you :o)