The Truth About Anti-Wrinkle Creams

If you’re a smart shopper, you’d probably like to know whether anti-wrinkle creams really work before you put down your paycheck for a tiny jar. Thankfully, Truth In Aging has the dirt on whether anti-wrinkle creams really work:

One of the (many) things that I love about the Truth In Aging community is that its members don’t take anything for granted. And recently two comments – from Susan and Dennis – really got me thinking and I realized that they both go to heart of what I am trying to do with Truth In Aging.

Actually, what’s funny is that in very different ways Susan and Dennis are raising the same issue. If I can summarize: Susan basically said if all these skin creams really worked then you wouldn’t have any wrinkles; while Dennis noted that it was a bit discouraging to hear that I had some new fine lines emerging especially when I have such a (to quote another member) “high maintenance” beauty routine. They are fair points and, when you think about it, pretty fundamental. I answered them both at the time, but I believe that they deserve a fuller response.

For years, many women were told by dermatologists that nothing really worked against wrinkles except for sunscreen and invasive solutions (involving injections of Botox and fillers, or cosmetic surgery). And, by and large, that was for a long time true; topical creams made promises that were simply not kept and most of us felt disillusioned at best, cheated at worst. But then five or so years ago, things started to change and cosmetics started to find clever breakthroughs with peptides and antioxidants. Anti-aging and anti-wrinkle creams started – to some extent – work.

Continue reading to find out if anti-wrinkle creams really work

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    • M’lou Arnett

      I love Truth in Aging, in fact I love truth in most things. Thanks for the post. It inspired me to reveal the truth behind Puristics, a line of anti-aging skin care products that really work, are free from any potentially harmful chemicals and are priced more manageably than many of the doctor or department store brands mentioned in the post. I’ve put some of the snippets from our clinical study in a blog post (http://mloublog.squarespace.com/), but there’s more on our website (www.puristics.com). I thought your readers might want to hear about another great option. Thanks for the great articles.