• Mon, Dec 5 2011

Why Giuliana Rancic Is Choosing A Double Mastectomy

giuliana rancic breast cancerIn October, Giuliana Rancic announced that she had the early stages of breast cancer and was undergoing a double lumpectomy. But after that procedure failed to give her the confidence that she would be cancer-free, Rancic revealed today that she is now going to have a double mastectomy.

The reality star and E! red carpet host had hoped that the results from the lumpectomies would show that all the cancer had been removed, but it didn’t. Her husband, Bill Rancic, told the Today show:

In the one breast they weren’t able to clear the margins and get all the cancer out. So we were then faced with a decision to make. Do you go back and do another lumpectomy, and try to clean it out or do you go for a more radical procedure?

After weighing the options of another surgery, radiation and anti-estrogen therapy, Giuliana, who is 37, decided that all of that could delay their decision to have children by years, and ultimately they wanted the best odds for her health.

She said:

In the end, all it came down to was just choosing to live and not looking over my shoulder for the rest of my life.

Granted, choosing to have both breasts removed can seem radical to some, but when you think about the quality of life of going through radiation for months, having another lumpectomy, being on anti-estrogen drugs (which have other long-term risks like menopausal side effects and the possible increased risk of uterine cancer) and delaying having children until she was in her 40s, those choices seem equally as radical–and not a 100% guarantee against the cancer coming back either. Ultimately, it’s a very personal decision and women need to choose what works best for them and their lives.

Giuliana explained:

For me, it was very important to just get the cancer out. That’s what I wanted to do. Just get it out. With the double mastectomy I have less than 1 percent chance of getting it (the cancer) back. With the lumpectomy, radiation and medication, I could have seen 20 to 30 to 40 percent chance in my lifetime, and for me it just wasn’t worth it.

Photo: msn.com

 

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