• Thu, Mar 22 2012

Soda Sales Are Slipping (But The Average American Still Drinks More Than A Can A Day)

what happens to your body when you drink soda

Here’s a great piece of positive, awesome news: it seems that consumers are wising up to the fact that soda, which is loaded with sugar and potential carcinogens but delivers absolutely no nutritional value whatsoever, is terrible for them–and they’re voting with their dollar. Apparently, 2011 was a pretty awful year for soda; according to new industry reports, sales of carbonated beverages have reached their lowest point since the 1990s. Hooray, consumers!

Over the course of 2011, soda saw its sales slip by a full percent, and 1.5% if you don’t include energy drinks. But that’s not to say that Big Soda is underwater–it’s still a billion dollar industry, and energy drinks are helping to keep it afloat–however, it has shown a marked decline since the mid-2000s, when consumers started to turn their attention to healthier (or healthier-seeming) alternatives, like water and flavored waters, and bottle teas.

Per capita, Americans are consuming the lowest number of carbonated beverages in 25 years, which is great news for our hearts, brains, livers, and yes, waists. That said, the average American still consumes about 714 eight-ounce servings (or about 476 cans) of soda per year–which is well over a can a day. of either regular or diet sodas, which can actually lead to weight gain, bloating, and, you know, heart attacks. Which is a lot. That’s a lot of soda.

Still, it’s awesome to see that, overall, consumers are opting for smarter beverage choices–but it’s not surprising that Americans are passing on the pop. Between specific, anti-soda messaging by public health organizations, and plenty of awareness about childhood obesity, you’d have to go out of your way not to see how many forces are advising against the consumption of sugary, nutritionally-devoid drinks. And it seems those healthy messages are sinking in.

Cheers to you, consumers!

Image: Africa Studio via Shutterstock

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