• Wed, Jun 27 2012

Photoshop Fail: Vogue China Removes Entire Leg, Continues To Suck At Body Positivity

photoshop fail vogue leg

Apparently, Vogue China’s idea of celebrating the female form and trying to be ambassadors for positive body image is removing a model’s leg. The whole let. But let’s give them the benefit of the doubt; maybe the leg in question just had a really long, hard day and was looking like it had an eating disorder, so the photo editors of Vogue China just told it to go home.

This particular Photoshop fail, which appears in the June issue of Vogue China, was documented by the good folks over at Photoshop Disasters, who point out that the model in question is Victoria’s Secret Angel Doutzen Kroes, who is decidedly not an amputee (see? Here are both of her legs)–and thus, the photo retouchers just actually removed her leg and never put it back. This does not bode well for Vogue China, who recently signed on with the rest of the Vogue editions to start being more conscientious of their impact on self-esteem and body image worldwide (remember how three out of four young girls, after looking through fashion magazines, feel like they’re “too fat”?).

Which isn’t to say that women who aren’t equipped with four limbs are unfit for modeling, as we know that isn’t the case. Take, for example,  a recent spread in Elle which included Paralympic athlete Jessica Long, who is a double-amputee, looking gorgeous and striking and body-positive in all of her muscular, powerful glory. Vogue, take a lesson.

Unfortunately, as predicted, Vogue‘s campaign to do better has continued to disappoint. Of course, we’re only a few months in, so there may still be time for them to turn it around? But I’m staying skeptical.

Image via Photoshop Disasters

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  • JustMom

    No wonder magazines are so expensive! First we have to pay the lousy photoshoppers then we have to pay the lousy department heads and lousy editors!

  • Jane

    Tabloids and fashion mags should be kept in the magazine isle instead of at the checkout counter so that women and girls aren’t confronted with these images every time they go to the store.