• Mon, Oct 22 2012

Stop Calling Yourself Fat: 5 Ways To Trash Negative Thoughts For Fat-Talk Free Week

negative thoughts body image fat-talk

Be honest: How mean have you been to yourself this weel? To other women? To a celebrity who you think gained a little weight? Because when we’re all being 100% truthful, the fact is that most of us engage in more fat-talk about ourself and other women than we’d like to admit.  This week, Tri Delta is instating a moratorium on internal body-snarking, fat-shaming, and other body-negative thoughts. It’s Fat-Talk Free Week, and we’ve got some tips from the good folks at Eating Recovery Center on how you can finally quell your inner critic–and start feeling better about yourself.

Started in 2008, Fat-Talk Free Week is an initiative to bring attention to all of the negativity that women feel toward their own bodies, and the very real health and wellness consequences those thoughts can have. Multiple studies have shown that fat-talk and poor body image can lead to depression and even a greater risk of obesity. But how do you break the cycle and end the fat-talk, when the message that thin is the same as healthy, beautiful, and successful are all around?

The truth is, while obesity is a serious public health crisis in our country, eating disorders are also a deadly plague on both women or men. But the solution to both of these lethal problems isn’t demonizing overweight or obese people, nor is it internalizing the latent fat-shaming that occurs both in the media and society. It’s adopting a more positive approach to our bodies–and, as a result, learning to take care of them.

Wanting to get in shape, be stronger, and eat better is not the same as harboring toxic, negative thoughts about your own body and its appearance. Eliminating fat-talk, then, is a great way to not only take a step toward fighting obesity and eating disorders–as well as to feel better about yourself, and further the conversation about the human body, health, self-esteem, and mental wellness.

This week, take the Fat-Talk Free Challenge. Not sure you can do it? The folks from Eating Recovery Center, an international center which provides comprehensive treatment for eating disorders, has compiled a list of ways to end negative thoughts about yourself (and others), while helping to cultivate a health-centered rhetoric about weight, food, and body-image. Here’s what they have to say:

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  • BFD

    While I love the idea of being kinder to yourself and to others, and to stop the negativity and fat-shaming, there is nothing wrong with the word “fat” on its own. It’s just a descriptor, like being tall or blonde. We need to take the power out of that word, not stop using it.

  • Megan @healthgeekchic

    Great article! This attitude of calming my inner critic was HUGE For me! It can be very transforming. I wrote about it here http://healthgeekchic.com/2012/09/25/calming-the-critic-within/