• Thu, Nov 29 2012

What’s In Gatorade? Flame Retardant Chemicals, Says One Awesome Teen’s Petition

what is in gatoradeAn awesome 15-year-old wants you to sign a petition to Gatorade telling them to stop putting “flame-retardant chemicals” in sports drinks. Did you even know you were drinking that? We didn’t!

Sarah Kavanagh says after she first noticed the list of ingredients on Gatorade’s Thirst Quencher Orange, she googled what they really were. On the change.org site where the Mississippi teen’s petition is posted, she writes:

The other day, I Googled “brominated vegetable oil.” It was the last time I drank Orange Gatorade. I found out that this “BVO” is a controversial flame retardant chemical that is in some Gatorade drinks! Who wants to drink that? Not me!

BVO is banned in Europe and Japan, but in the U.S. it’s patented by many chemical companies as a flame retardant–and it’s used in some fruit-flavored drinks, like Gatorade Orange. Apparently this chemical keeps the flavors mixed, and without it, the orange flavor would float to the surface.

But is that any reason to use it? No, says Kavanagh who explains that she “always believed Gatorade when they said stuff in their ads about how it’s good to drink when exercising”:

I’m not a scientist, but if there are lots of suspicious things about putting a flame retardant chemical in Gatorade (most flavors don’t even use it!) then why would Gatorade want to put it in a product designed for people like me who are into sports and health?

Excellent point. This is just another example of deceptive marketing. Gatorade markets their products to athletes, and yet they are serving us potentially toxic chemicals.

To show your disapproval about this, here is the petition Kavanagh wants us to sign:

Dear Gatorade,

You put slick ads on TV encouraging people like me to buy your products, but it’s shocking that you have a flame retardant chemical called ‘brominated vegetable oil’ in some flavors. Please stop deceiving consumers and remove this chemical from your products.

We know you can do better than this! We look forward to hearing an update.

To take action and sign this, click here. In the mean time, stick with other Gatorade flavors–or better yet, water.

Photo: flickr.com/steguis

 

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  • Someguyfromtheinternet

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration considers BVO to be safe for use as a food additive,[5]

    “Code of Federal Regulations, Title 21—Food and Drugs, Chapter I—Food and Drug Administration, Department of Heath and Human Services, Subchapter B—Food for Human Consumption, Part 180—Food Additives Permitted in Food or in Contact with Food on an Interum Basis Pending Additional Study”. Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations. Retrieved 2007-09-17.

  • Ben

    “All things fine in moderation” should be considered prior to rant about a ‘fire retardant’ being in Gatorade, as well as many other soft drinks. The fact that something can be used as a fire retardant does not mean it is inherently bad for you, especially in low to moderate doses. Did this awesome 15 year old or Ms. Dunham stop to consider what a great fire retardant water is as well as how if you ingest too much water (dilutional hyponatremia) it can kill you? Of course not. Also, just how is Gatorade deceiving consumers when this ingredient is obviously labeled on the packaging? Should every food or drink item containing water have it listed as ‘fire retardant’? Good grief. http://www.dhmo.org