• Wed, Jul 3 - 3:30 pm ET

Low-fat Milk Probably Isn’t Good For You

deadly-dairy-milk-is-so-badIn addition to being a disgusting abomination, low-fat milk may not even be good for you.

According to Harvard professor of pediatrics David Ludwig, MD in the current issue of JAMA Pediatrics (Journal of the American Medical Association), reduced fat milk is a liquid sugar bomb and the current USDA and American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines should be revised. Those guidelines were written, probably with the milk lobby in mind, to encourage people to stop drinking their calories unless it’s in the form of delicious, American cow’s milk!

Apparently those guidelines recommend Americans of all ages drink three cups of milk a day. That’s why all Americans are currently dying of obesity. According to Forbes “2-percent milk contains 12.3 grams of sugar, more than a Reeses Peanut Butter Cup and almost as much as a chocolate chip cookie.” The three recommended cups a day would exceed anyone’s recommended sugar intake.

Low-fat milk isn’t just a sugary nightmare–calorically speaking, reduced fat milk still packs a fucking wallop. At 122 calories a cup, if you drank the recommended amount, 366 of your daily calories would go to drinking that disgusting colloid which is only vaguely based on actual milk. Imagine what you could eat with those 366 calories! All the almonds and quinoa in the world basically.

What about my precious bones?” You may ask. Your bones are going to be fine. Dr. Ludwig says we can get enough calcium from consuming foods like fish and greens–we don’t have to guzzle down cow-milk and fatten up as rapidly as a calf. You can if you want to though–that’s why America is #1.

Story via Forbes//Image via Shutterstock

What We're Reading:
Share This Post:
  • Julia Sonenshein

    THREE glasses of milk a day? I think I would rather have broken bones.

    • Joanna Rafael

      Imagine the stomach pain after three frothy glasses of milk.

    • Katie

      I don’t know why the addition of the word “frothy” made me want to vom.

      I don’t like milk in general. But I’m a big supporter of it! Spesh after reading “Real Food” by Nina Planck. But that’s an entirely different story since the focus is raw milk.

    • Joanna Rafael

      I’m half-grossed out by milk and half-super into it. Definitely would prefer raw milk over chemical grossness.

      Should I check out “Real Food” by Nina Planck?

    • Katie

      Um absolutely 100%. She’s an awesome lady and she is an American who basically single-handedly founded the London Farmers’ Markets.

  • nicmart

    Is there some reason why this article needs to contain an expletive aside from the writer’s immaturity?

    • Joanna Rafael

      I just want you to pay attention to me, nicmart.

    • nicmart

      Facts interest me; you don’t.

    • Joanna Rafael

      You’re acting interested in me.

    • nicmart

      We can attribute your misapprehension to adolescence and poor reading skills.

    • Joanna Rafael

      Stop commenting here and you won’t seem so into me. I’m sorry things aren’t going your way and you feel the need to irritate strangers on the internet.

      If a bunch of fertile young women in their early twenties think you’re a joke, evolutionarily speaking, is it a good sign for you?

    • nicmart

      The only “bunch” I notice concerned with this is you. If any young women do trouble themselves to read my comment about sugar, perhaps they will wonder why you couldn’t be troubled to check a couple of milk cartons before posting a scientifically bogus article. And they might wonder why you haven’t made a correction. Maybe young women are as concerned with facts and truth as any other age group. They also might wonder why you are obsessed with the idea that someone who comments about your article is “into” you. I’ve posted comments about tens of thousands of articles, and you are the first writer who thought my post was a sign of personal fascination with her.

    • Joanna Rafael

      For the time being, I’ll have to ignore the way you finished that gem of a comment by dismissively mocking my vernacular due to my age and gender so that I can address the fact that you seemingly can’t grasp the facetiousness behind my claim that you’re fascinated with me. It’s a joke. A little wink to how unreasonable and strange it is for you to be so unrelenting with your comments.

      Anyway, a Harvard professor and JAMA are more scientifically reputable than you are. What sort of correction do you think I’d make? “Author of thousands of internet comments and receiver of totally real love letters, Nicmart checked some of his many bottles of skim milk and has out-smarted legitimate scientists who were too stupid to read labels.” Please.

    • nicmart

      Your narcissistic and puerile comments aside, science has nothing to do with who performs it. One of the great scientists in American history, Richard Feynman, said, “Science is the belief in the ignorance of experts.”

      It is very unlikely that you actually read the article you wrote about since it requires a paid subscription. I can’t read it either. I’ll quote someone who did read it and posted a comment to another site:

      “The overarching theme of the recommendation article in Pediatrics is not about milk having too much sugar, but how we shouldn’t be recommending low-fat milk over full-fat milk. This is because full-fat milk helps with satiety and can help prevent over-eating.”

      So, you apparently missed the point of the article, you didn’t bother to look at boxes of milk to compare sugar content, and now you embarrass yourself by trying to turn criticism of your article into evidence of an interest in “fertile” you. Your fertility seems a more appropriate topic for your Facebook page than for this web site.

      Grow up, deal with what you wrote, learn about science, and separate your fertility from the topics about which you write. Oh, and learn to deal with criticism.

    • Joanna Rafael

      Oh, wow.

    • Julia Sonenshein

      I’m very fertile and very interested in your unique take on milk.

    • nicmart

      Lactation is champion. Good luck.

    • Julia Sonenshein

      I like expletives and I hate milk this is great article for me

  • nicmart

    Research? I just looked at two cartons of milk. Whole mile contains 12gms of sugar and non-fat milk has 13gms. The numbers are not going to be exact, so there may be a difference of less than 1gm of sugar between the two, which is nutritionally inconsequential.

    • Joanna Rafael

      You have two cartons of milk?

    • nicmart

      Amazing, isn’t it? But a short trip of a market is all that was necessary to debunk your article.

    • JMB

      An article which is not even her own, but a poorly paraphrased version of the Forbes article she links to.

    • nicmart

      I’m sorry to say that it is obvious that you are into her.

  • Stosphia

    Well, that’s what you get for drinking baby food….

  • Some guy

    Your writing is terrible. Your opinions are ridiculous. You’ve written an article about the sugar content of milk but used the words: disgusting abomination, bomb, nightmare. You say unequivocally that three glasses of milk a day are why all Americans are dying of obesity. All of them? That’s quite a lot. I guess that’s how our empire falls. It was the milk, who could have known?

    In a paranoid fit, you refer to the milk lobby as if this is some sinister cabal.

    Milk is an important source of protein and b vitamins, and it’s very important for the growth of children living in poverty. Not ridiculous histrionic buffoons with scientific pretensions that reads studies as if they’re sacred tablets unearthed from Chichen Itza. Oh but it’s….Harvard! If the relevant scientific data came from a state university, would it have the same crimsony magic? I doubt it, and if it’s one thing I’ve learned, it’s that science is inscrutable magic that only the high priests from Harvard can fathom.

    It’s a good thing nobody will ever take you seriously, because it would probably involve children dying of malnutrition. As it is, this is embarrassing. I’m embarrassed for you. About the sugar content, are you suggesting three Reeses pieces in a day constitute a disgusting abomination murder rape bomb that will kill America outright? Will you be making a thinspiration post next?

  • JMB

    There’s a logical disconnect between the bulk of the JAMA article and the (presumably) last paragraph.
    Dr. Ludwig has done no studies of his own, by the way, but cites other
    studies that would cast doubt on the promotion of a reduced-fat, high-glycemic index diet. He suggests (as other experts have) that what’s important is the fat/sugar ratio, not the total fat or total sugar content independent of the other. But while he implicitly espouses whole
    milk over lowfat for the first 3/4 of the article, he follows by questioning any value of cow’s milk in human nutrition. Of course, this is also where his citations to valid studies are suddenly and conspicuously absent. He mentions shreds of evidence pointing to other cultures that do not consume milk, but doesn’t offer a clue as to the health and nutrition status of those peoples, nor does he consider the role of genetics or the availability of other food sources of calcium, etc. for these populations. (Is there more to his article?) If he doesn’t have a vegetarian moralist agenda here, he’s not convincing me. And, I agree with others who have commented here that journalistic integrity above is seriously lacking.

  • M

    Meh – almond milk is pretty good for you with more calcium, and the unsweetened kind has 1g carbs per serving. I use it in my protein shakes after I work out. I still put half and half in my tea, however. I’m not that worried and am Type I. To say milk is the entire cause of our obesity issues is vast over-simplification imo.

  • Alyson Melody

    It’s unsurprising. I’m pretty sure humans are the only mammals who consume milk past infancy, and it’s not even our own milk. How on earth do we expect it to be beneficial? Ugh.