• Tue, Feb 25 - 11:00 am ET

5 Reasons Your Body Sucks At Sex

lion orgasmIf you’re not having great sex riddled with toe-curling orgasm after toe-curling orgasm, don’t worry, it’s probably your stupid body’s fault. Our favorite rag, The Daily Mail, says so and gives semi-legit reasons blaming you and your bod for the good sex you’re not having. {Keep in mind, I said semi-legit, so take this all with a grain of lube.}

Here are 5 explanations why your body sucks at sex:

1) You Take Birth Control Pillsbirth control orgasm

Oh you thought it would make sex better by eliminating some worry related to the negative side effects of sex? WRONG. Sort of.

Last year, a study published by Indiana University showed that some of 1,101 women subjects who were using contraceptives like the patch or the pill had fewer orgasms, less frequent intercourse and lower levels of arousal  than the women who used condoms and other non-hormal contraceptive methods.

Dr. Cynthia Graham, leading sex researcher (cool job) from the University of Southampton believes that this phenomenon is probably due to the Pill’s adverse affect on libdo. Women on the pill are having less sex and therefore fewer orgasms. 

2) You’re On Anti-Depressantsanti depressant orgasm

If you’re so depressed that you have no sex drive, anti depressants probably won’t help you put the spark back into your sex-life…even if they save your life.

According to Rutgers psych professor and neuroscientist, Barry Komisaruk,  ”Antidepressants and antipsychotic drugs have a very powerful inhibitory effect on orgasm.” The most common type of prescribed anti depressants, SSRIs (selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors) increase levels of serotonin in the brain, but are renowned for having a negative effect on sexual response and orgasm. You see, serotonin inhibits dopamine which is critical to arousal. It also reduces nerve sensation and lowers levels of nitric oxide which widens blood vessels keeps blood flowing down in your genitals.

So what are you supposed to do if you’re depressed? Just accept that you won’t be aroused whether or not you choose to medicate your illness? Not necessarily. There is a way to battle serotonin’s effect on your sexual activity. Recent research from the University of Texas implies that exercise could combat the restricted blood flow effect, making orgasm possible again. 

3) You Have Bad Circulationblood orgasm

They say it’s not the size or shape of the boat, but the motion in the ocean. In this case, imagine a stagnant ocean full of your own blood.

Men who have erectile dysfunction often have crummy blood flow (Viagra, the boner pill, increases blood flow) and experts are starting to believe that similar circulation troubles are causing women’s orgasm problems. Doctors believe that the clitoris needs “adequate blood flow” just like a penis in order to get functional lady erections.

Dr Graham Jackson, chairman of the Sexual Advice Association and a cardiologist at Guy’s and St Thomas’ Hospitals, has an inkling that female sexual dysfunction may be a vascular problem though they “don’t have any concrete evidence of this yet.” Others believe that female sexuality is too strongly linked to psychology, and believe sexual dysfunction in women cannot be narrowed down to one factor.

4) You’re Old
aging orgasm

I plan on never peaking sexually and having more and more orgasms every year until I die having the best intercourse of my life on a swingers-sex-catamaran. That is the plan and nothing can stop me, except for my own hormones.

As women age, hormone levels change. For women, levels of testosterone plummet as we creep toward the grave. That’s part of the reason why older women stop having as many orgasms as younger women and why they report their climaxes are less intense than before.

Dr. Maupin, the author of a new book called The Secret Female Hormone: How Testosterone Replacement Can Change Your Life unsurprisingly says that “Testosterone really is the orgasm hormone,” though it is not the only involved hormone. Per Dr. Maupin, testosterone stimulates other “important hormones, for example oxytocin which we require for orgasm. It also increases dopamine and nitric oxide which boosts blood flow to the pelvis.” If you couldn’t tell by the title of her book, Dr. Maupin conjectures that more women of a certain age should dabble in testosterone replacement. 

5) You’re Gaining Weightweight orgasm

More cushion for the pushin’ might not be pushin’ your sex buttons in the right way.

It isn’t just aging that adjust hormone levels in the female body, weight gain can also cause hormones involved in sexual pleasure to alter. Obesity can cause cardiovascular problems and diabetes, both resulting in a reduction of blood flow to the crotch and to the stimulatory centers of the brain that channel sexual arousal. Gaining weight can also cause “an overproduction of a protein called sex hormone binding globulin, which reduces testosterone levels and therefore libido and orgasm” according to gynecologist, Nick Panay.

There you have it, kids. If you aren’t enjoying sex, it’s not you– it’s your body.

via The Daily Mail//Images via Shutterstock

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  • elle

    You know, I have terrible circulation and a few years ago ny homeopath recommended take Niacin. It never correlated but sex got so much better. Now I have to wonder if that’s why.

    • Joanna Rafael

      Ooooo. Maybe I’ll try niacin.

  • Mary

    All I can say with regards to antidepressants is to be willing to change if you have sexual side effects with one. I have, unfortunately, a long history of depression. The first antidepressant I took made me unable to reach orgasm at all… and, because I was so relieved to not be a suicidal mess, I kept on taking it because I was afraid to stop. Several years after stopping the first antidepressant, I gave birth and was hit by severe postpartum depression but did not want to go back on meds because of the side effects. Finally, after realizing that I was doing my kids no favours by not treating my illness, I went on a different med, and had no effect on sexual function at all. It’s worth trying different meds to find one that works for you with the minimum side effects. It’s not one size fits all.

    • Joanna Rafael

      excellent advice.

  • Alyson Melody

    Hormonal birth control scares me anyway. Guh.

  • Alyson Melody

    Hormonal birth control scares me anyway. Guh.