Topic: healthy breakfast

7 Healthy Breakfast Foods (That Are Better Than Bagels and Cereal)

7 Healthy Breakfast Foods (That Are Better Than Bagels and Cereal)

If you chow down a bowl of cereal or go for a breakfast bagel before you head out the door in the morning, chances are good you’ll be napping at your desk a few hours later. You don’t have to be a rocket scientist to figure out that healthy breakfast foods don’t just help with weight loss and weight management; they also determine your productivity. For better concentration levels, improved energy and a slimmer waistline, I recommend picking a few of these healthy breakfast ideas to replace your bagel and cereal habit. More »

What To Eat When You’re Sick Of Oatmeal: Quinoa Porridge

What To Eat When You're Sick Of Oatmeal: Quinoa Porridge

Oatmeal is delicious, and everyone from Jillian Michaels to Sophia Bush endorses it as a healthy breakfast. But for those of us who thrive on variety, a daily bowl just gets really…boring. So to switch things up–and pack a little more protein in while we’re at it–we’ve been experimenting with quinoa porridge instead. It’s equally delicious, if not more, and it actually cooks quicker than steel-cut oats. Plus, it’s slightly lighter tasting (and feeling), so it’s particularly well-suited to summer. More »

Breaking Fast With Starbucks: Best and Worst Breakfast Choices To Go With Your Skinny Latte

Breaking Fast With Starbucks: Best and Worst Breakfast Choices To Go With Your Skinny Latte

As I stood in line to pay for my tall, decaf, non-fat, extra-hot mocha the other day at Starbucks, I was tempted by an orange-cranberry scone in the pastry case that seemed to be staring at me. “How bad can a scone be?” I wondered. “It’s not like it’s one of those glazed apple fritters or oversized blueberry muffins in there,” I rationalized. But before I could make up my mind, the perky Starbucks girl was asking for my debit card. Lucky for me; when I got home, I decided to research that beckoning scone, and it turns out, it has a whopping 490 calories and 18 grams of fat. Crisis averted. More »

Krispy Kreme Wants YOU…To Be Healthy?

Krispy Kreme Wants YOU...To Be Healthy?

Krispy Kreme is synonymous with deep-fried, sugar-glazed dough, which is why we were utterly confused when Business Week told us that “Krispy Kreme Wants To Be Good For You.” You read that right. Apparently, Chief Executive Office James Morgan wants customers to stop pigeonholing his company as a coffee-and-doughnuts chain meant for rare indulgence (or obese regulars); he’s aiming to win our regular breakfast money with healthier fare like orange juice, yogurt, and oatmeal. More »

False Advertisement: Why Nutri-Grain Cereals Will Not Make You “Feel Great”

False Advertisement: Why Nutri-Grain Cereals Will Not Make You "Feel Great"

Nutri-Grain newest advertisement, below, claims we’ll “feel great” after eating one of their breakfast bars (great enough to quit our jobs, get married, and punch each other in the stomachs, apparently). But just like we suspect that most Americans are over Jerry Maguire jokes, we also hope they’re over the idea that Nutri-Grain bars can really make you feel good at all: Despite their updated flavors and packaging claiming antioxidant power and healthy dose of fiber, the brand is just selling glorified cookies for breakfast. Last time we checked, that didn’t make us feel too great. More »

America’s 10 Healthiest Fast Food Breakfasts

America's 10 Healthiest Fast Food Breakfasts

Health magazine just announced the 10 best fast food breakfasts, giving health-conscious, time-starved consumers the green light to stop at Starbucks for breakfast-on-the-go. Their nutritional criteria are straightforward – all meals had to be under 400 calories, low in saturated fat, and contain a good mix of proteins, complex carbohydrates, and healthy fats, according to Health‘s Editor-in-Chief, Ellen Kunes. The full list of approved fast food breakfasts is in the magazine for now, but their top ten breakfasts are quickly flooding health and news sites.

In general, we hope our readers can reserve at least a few mornings per week to get up early and make their own eggs and not-bacon, because even if the following meals are balanced and low-calorie, they’re still processed and packaged. But we’re not immune to busy mornings with no time to cook, either, so here’s our take on the ten happiest meals you can eat from a fast-food restaurant before noon, plus nutrition facts to help you make an educated decision, even if you haven’t had your coffee yet: More »

Breakfast of Champions: What to Eat Now That Big Breakfasts are Out

Breakfast of Champions: What to Eat Now That Big Breakfasts are Out

Whether or not you believe that bigger breakfasts lead to bigger waistlines, most of us can agree that certain morning meals are healthier. Any certified nutritionist will tell you that fasting until lunch is a big metabolism mistake, but gorging yourself on pancakes and bacon isn’t a smart way to start your day, either. So what really constitutes a breakfast of champions? Getting a lot of protein and fiber is important, but there are good (low-fat, high-vitamin) and bad (high-fat, high-sugar) ways to get what you need. Here are TIME‘s suggestions for five five healthy breakfasts you can eat now that big breakfasts are out: More »

Healthy Oatmeal Throwdown: Fast Food vs. Homemade

Healthy Oatmeal Throwdown: Fast Food vs. Homemade

Earlier this week, we posted about McDonald’s recent addition of oatmeal to the menu, skeptical of their marketing slogan, “when wholesome meets delicious” (we don’t consider sugary toppings ‘wholesome’). Still, many of our readers weren’t so perturbed by the overall nutrition value of McDonald’s new breakfast – “I personally consider under-300 calories to be a perfectly reasonable amount to eat for breakfast, even if you’re on a diet,” said one commenter. “And the nutrition facts aren’t so terribly different than when I make truly 100% natural oatmeal for myself at home (1/2 cup pre-cooked oats, cooked in water with 1/4 cup raisins and topped with 1 tsp brown sugar and a couple of tablespoons of nonfat milk).” More »