Topic: leukemia

Awesome Colts Cheerleaders Shave Their Heads To Support Cancer-Stricken Coach

Awesome Colts Cheerleaders Shave Their Heads To Support Cancer-Stricken Coach

Did any of you catch the two Indianapolis Colts cheerleaders shaving their heads  last night during the game against the Buffalo Bills? The women, Crystal Ann and Megan M. shaved their heads in solidarity with coach Chuck Pagano, who has  been battling leukemia. A fundraising drive initiated by the Colt’s mascot, Blue, raised $22,000 for leukemia research. More »

Ravers, Rejoice: Ecstasy May Be Able To Cure Cancer

Ravers, Rejoice: Ecstasy May Be Able To Cure Cancer

Club kids are a mysterious demographic, with strange customs and unusual fashion sense. They also, apparently, have been sitting on (and rolling with) a potential cure for blood cancer. MDMA, the drug that makes Ecstasy so totally amazing that it’s OK to wear furry hats and plastic jewelry, has been widely reported to have potential cancer-curing properties and could, in theory, be used to treat diseases like leukemia. More »

Cancer Treatment By Facebook: Social Media Saves Lives, Not Just Status Updates

Cancer Treatment By Facebook: Social Media Saves Lives, Not Just Status Updates

Social media can take credit for changing many people’s lives, but for Huw Williams, were it not for Facebook, he might not be alive today.

Williams was diagnosed with leukemia in 2008 and desperately needed a bone marrow transplant in order to survive. His initial drug treatment failed and no one in his family was a match, so his chances of getting a transplant looked grim. But one click from a random person on Facebook changed Williams’ life forever. More »

Chronic Health Conditions: How I Live With Hailey-Hailey Skin Disease

Chronic Health Conditions: How I Live With Hailey-Hailey Skin Disease

This is the first in a series of Blisstree posts about living with chronic health conditions.

I have a weird, chronic skin disease. It’s called Hailey-Hailey (named after two doctor brothers who discovered it in 1939). It’s a rare, genetic, autosomal (not autoimmune) skin condition, which means it’s chromosomal, but has nothing to do with the sex chromosomes. Lots of people – including medical professionals – confuse Hailey-Hailey with eczema or psoriasis, but it’s not either. (And it’s not contagious, so if you meet me, don’t be scared.) I’ve had HH all my life, but its symptoms usually lie dormant until the patient is in their early- to mid-20s. Without getting too technical and scientific, basically a missing protein and a calcium pump malfunction mean that the skin’s cells can’t properly adhere to each other. So they split apart – like cuts. And it gets better: These cuts often blister, weep, and bleed. Hailey-Hailey’s painful rash-like symptoms typically hang out on the chest, back, neck, upper arms, underarms, and backs of the legs. Imagine having a lot of open sores all over your body, and never being sure when they’re going to go away. At its best, HH looks like a bunch of little blisters. At its worst, your skin looks like it’s been attacked by a small but rabid animal. It’s a lot of fun. But lest I wallow in self pity, there are other HH sufferers out there who have it even worse than I do (under their breasts, on their genitals, on their rear end). More »