Topic: medicine

Sex Doesn’t Have To Hurt

Sex Doesn't Have To Hurt

There’s a condition called dyspareunia, that’s just a science-name for sexual intercourse that hurts (in a bad way, not a cool masochistic way). Dr. Lynne T. Schuster, a physician at Mayo Clinic’s Women’s Health Clinic in Rochester, Minn. told CBSnews.com … More »

Friendly Reminder: Avoid Publicly Advertising Your Eagerness For Circumcision

Friendly Reminder: Avoid Publicly Advertising Your Eagerness For Circumcision

We’re all guilty of saying a little too much on the Internet sometimes without thinking the implications of our words through, but most of us won’t have to deal with huge consequences for them besides perhaps a little “tsk tsk.” But this isn’t always the case: one nurse in Spokane, WA, had the unfortunate experience this week of finding out just how terribly unforgiving the Internet can be if you piss a few people off. More »

Zoobiquity: How We Can Improve Health Care By Paying Closer Attention To Our Pets

Zoobiquity: How We Can Improve Health Care By Paying Closer Attention To Our Pets

If your dog’s vet and your OB/GYN got together, do you think they’d have much to talk about? They could probably share common ground on the obesity epidemic, which both people and our pets are struggling from. They may be able to talk about how both you and your canine companion are predisposed to breast cancer, depending on her breed. In fact, vets and doctors actually have a lot in common–and, to treat both humans and other animals the best way possible, they should probably be talking more. That’s the subject of Zoobiquity: What Animals Can Teach Us About Health And The Science Of Healing, a new book by Dr. Barbara Natterson-Horowitz and Kathryn Bowers. More »

How A High-Powered Job Keeps A Schizophrenic Woman Sane

How A High-Powered Job Keeps A Schizophrenic Woman Sane

This is a post from our sister site, TheGrindstone.

Keris Myrick is the successful chief executive of a non-profit organization in Southern California, where she oversees a staff of three dozen people. She also suffers from schizoaffective disorder, which is similar to schizophrenia, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. But instead of adding stress to her life, her doctors say her job actually helps keep her sane.

Myrick’s story was the subject of a surprising, inspiring story this weekend in the New York Times. Her decision to pursue meaningful, even difficult, work has helped prompt doctors to reconsider their assumptions about how mental illness should be managed. Myrick is part of an ongoing study of high-functioning people with schizophrenia, including two doctors, a lawyer, and Myrick. “It’s just embarrassing,” Dr. Stephen R. Marder, one of the authors of the study, told the paper. “For years, we as psychiatrists have been telling people with a diagnosis what to expect; we’ve been telling them who they are, how to change their lives — and it was bad information” for many of them. More »

Orexigen’s New Diet Pill, Contrave, Nears FDA Approval

Orexigen's New Diet Pill, Contrave, Nears FDA Approval

Contrave, a new diet pill from the pharmaceutical company Orexigen, won a U.S. panel recommendation that brings it one step closer to winning FDA approval, which will be announced after the final vote on January 31. Despite associated cardiovascular risks, the drug is expected to win approval, which would make it the first new diet pill to come on the market in the last decade. More »

If Doctors Have Been Brushing Off Your Stomach Troubles, You’re Not Alone

If Doctors Have Been Brushing Off Your Stomach Troubles, You're Not Alone

Those with chronic stomach pain are often told to wait it out, try not to stress, and make sure they watch their diets, but anyone who’s had a bellyache for longer than about a day will tell you that a prescription of TUMS and patience is less than satisfactory. According to The New York Times, this kind of prescription for abdominal pain is all too common, partially because it’s so hard to diagnose. More »