Topic: sexist advertising

LYNX Deodorant Ad Makes Female “Rugby Players” Look More Sexual Than Sporty

LYNX Deodorant Ad Makes Female "Rugby Players" Look More Sexual Than Sporty

From time to time we post our gripes about the sorry state of women’s sports: Not enough people watch, there aren’t enough female athletes…you’re probably familiar with the arguments. But Australian deodorant company, LYNX, has solved our problems! They put female athletes front and center in their recent ad, which explains rugby rules as demonstrated by women (barely) dressed in bikini versions of rugby uniforms, wrestling with each other over a rugby ball that looks like a giant white egg. It turns out, if female athletes a) look like models, b) wear more makeup than clothing, and c) make their moves as sexually suggestive as possible, they can easily capture more attention than male athletes. More »

The Body Positive: 10 Healthy Ads With An Unhealthy Body Image

The Body Positive: 10 Healthy Ads With An Unhealthy Body Image

When you consider the amount of time and money that goes into making an ad campaign, it’s amazing certain advertisements make the cut. Especially in the so-called “health”category: Even products that are supposed to make us healthier, cleaner and happier manage to insult us. (Case in point: last week’s new milk-for-PMS campaign pushing the idea that women are irrational monsters who can only be calmed by a half gallon of milk and and an apologetic husband.) One of our biggest pet peeves, though (and one that just so happens to relate to our The Body Positive week here at Blisstree) is the bad body image they promote. More »

Brazil Butt Lift: Watch Where You Put That Pencil

Brazil Butt Lift: Watch Where You Put That Pencil

Brazil Butt Lift is a workout and exercise program from Beachbody, the same company behind P90X and Insanity, that incorporates movements specifically designed to target your badonk-badonk. Claiming to firm, tone, and lift your butt, it is designed by Brazillian fitness specialist Leandro Carvalho. The infomercial, which uses the word “butt” more than a drunk fraternity bro at his first frosh week party, is obnoxious and silly. There are apparent unpaid testimonials from customers who say they now enjoy getting “whistles and catcalls,” which sets the women’s movement back 20 years, and then instructor Carvalho appears, talking about your “butt type,” and how our “butts are complex.” More »