Topic: soups

Around the World In 20 Stews: A Roundup Of International Stew Recipes

Around the World In 20 Stews: A Roundup Of International Stew Recipes

According to Wikipedia, a stew is ”a combination of solid food ingredients that have been cooked in liquid and served in the resultant gravy. Sounds simple enough. But while all stews may be based on the same general concept, they vary greatly when it comes to execution in different parts of the world. It’s interesting to see how regional produce and ingredients influence these recipes, even when basics — beans, tomato, lamb, fish — remain the same. From meat-heavy Latin American stews to spicy Mediterranean dishes and rich, savory European affairs, here are tK recipes for hearty winter stews from cuisines around the globe. More »

Vegan Slow-Cooker Broth Makes An Easy Base For Quick Winter Soups

Vegan Slow-Cooker Broth Makes An Easy Base For Quick Winter Soups

Now that winter is seriously approaching, I’m happy to be breaking out my slow cooker again. I know some people whip things up in them year round, but to me the slow cooker (or Crock Pot as my mom still calls it) means stews, chili and soups. So I love this idea from Oregonian writer Grant Butler: A basic vegan broth that you can make in the slow-cooker, freeze and use later to make quick and flavorful soups all winter. More »

Winter Table: Slow-Cooker Bison Stew

Winter Table: Slow-Cooker Bison Stew

This recipe is a variation on the slow-cooker beef stew my mom made when I was growing up, only I substituted bison meat for beef. Bison is leaner than beef but contains about 25% more protein, along with higher levels of iron and vitamin B12. It’s got less calories, fat or cholesterol than either beef, pork of chicken. And the majority of bison are free-range, grass-fed and hormone-free. That makes this bison stew a nutritious dish—and one you can easily throw together in a slow-cooker, let simmer for a few hours, and enjoy for dinner on a cold winter’s eve. More »

Autumn Eats: Easy, Creamy Tomato Basil Soup

Autumn Eats: Easy, Creamy Tomato Basil Soup

As the weather gets chillier, I can’t stop thinking about soup (is that weird?). Soup is just about the only thing I want to eat right now—and by soup, I mean homemade soup, because I’d like to avoid the sodium, BPA and blandness of Campbell’s and its ilk, thank you very much. I’d also like to avoid spending copious time in the kitchen, though. The following recipe for creamy tomato basil soup, adapted from a recipe by nutritionist Lauren Talbot, uses vegetable broth and and your favorite brand of tomato pasta sauce as its base, cutting down on both time and the total number of ingredients you need to add. More »

Summer Seasonables: Chilled Watermelon Cucumber Soup

Summer Seasonables: Chilled Watermelon Cucumber Soup

Earlier this week, I wrote about watermelons being the fruit du jour (or of the month, really) and shared a watermelon and feta salad recipe. Here’s another savory and summery watermelon dish to try, inspired by a recipe in the book Home Made Simple. It’s vegan, mostly raw (save for the olives and the olive oil), incredibly refreshing and the only effort it requires is a little chopping and the pressing of the blend button. More »

Summer Seasonables: Chilled Garlic Soup

Summer Seasonables: Chilled Garlic Soup

Though I add copious fresh garlic to nearly everything I cook, I tend to think of it as a condiment—something to add flavor to dishes, not nutrients. But garlic is actually a nutritional powerhouse in and of itself—it’s been shown to help lower cholesterol and blood pressure, protect your heart, fight inflammation and fight bacterial infections. It’s rich in health-promoting sulfur compounds, Vitamin C, selenium and manganese. More »

Summer Seasonables: Farmer’s Market Soup

Summer Seasonables: Farmer's Market Soup

You might balk at the idea of summer soup (in this heat wave?), but its one of the easiest ways to use a bunch of in-season vegetables at once. Keep the broth light and add a light grain (like amaranth or quinoa), and you’ve got a soup that’s a little more August than October. Make a big pot on Sunday, and you can bring the leftovers to work (it’s usually ultra-air-conditioned in your office anyway, right?) all week. More »