Topic: stroke

Frankie Muniz Had A Stroke At Age 27…Which Is Apparently Getting Far More Common Than You Think

Frankie Muniz Had A Stroke At Age 27...Which Is Apparently Getting Far More Common Than You Think

Frankie Muniz‘s stroke was first signalled on Instagram and Twitter, but he went on Good Morning America today to explain what’s going on with his health, in over 140 characters. Apparently, his doctors later told him that he’d suffered a mini stroke, but his experience sounded full-size scary: He first knew something was wrong when he began losing vision during a motorcycle ride. “I couldn’t say words. I thought I was saying them! My fiance, was looking at me like I was speaking a foreign language,” he explained. One of the scariest parts is that he’s only 27 years old–and while strokes only hit about 10% of people between 15 and 44, it’s become more and more common in recent years. More »

Another Study Links Eating Chocolate To Lowered Stroke Risk

Another Study Links Eating Chocolate To Lowered Stroke Risk

As much as it’s a giant female stereotype, it’s also a little bit true–women do tend to love chocolate (or at least, they love to read about it), and they’re always looking to find another shred of evidence that it may, in fact, be a little bit beneficial to their health. So here’s another one to add to the healthy chocolate pile: a recent study found that women who ate more chocolate were less likely to have a stroke. More »

Study: Depression Linked To Higher Stroke Risk (But So Are Antidepressants)

Study: Depression Linked To Higher Stroke Risk (But So Are Antidepressants)

In the latest ‘damned-if-do, damned-if-you-don’t’ health news: New research says that depression increases a woman’s stroke risk—but taking antidepressants makes the risk even higher. And this is no half-hearted, small-scale study we’re talking about, either; Harvard University researchers looked at the health histories and practices of 80,000 women, beginning in 1976. Between 2000 and 2006, women aged 54 to 79 with no previous stroke history were specifically monitored. Ultimately, depressed women had a 29% greater risk of having a stroke, and depressed women who were taking anti-depressants had a 39% greater stroke risk. More »

Stroke Report: How To Identify The Warning Signs

Stroke Report: How To Identify The Warning Signs

The Globe And Mail is reporting on an alarming statistic, that one in three women cannot identify the warning signs of stroke, which (at least in part) makes strokes more likely to be fatal in men than women. A study conducted by the Heart and Stroke Foundation also found that many women also aren’t aware of stroke risks, which include high blood pressure, diabetes, smoking, and a lack of physical activity. This is particularly worrying, considering that 80% of strokes are preventable. I wanted to test this theory so I took to Twitter to see how many people could identify the stroke warning signs without googling them. More »

Why Our Readers Rock: “What If You Stopped Smoking Right Now?” Video from David Carnegie

Why Our Readers Rock: "What If You Stopped Smoking Right Now?" Video from David Carnegie

We feel flattered every time a we get a reader comment, and we jump up and down when we get new fans on Facebook, so you can imagine how elated we were when we discovered that one of our readers created an entire video inspired by one of our posts about quitting smoking. David Carnegie, aka @CreelmanKid on Twitter, posted a link to his video, inspired by the Blisstree post, “What Happens to Your Body If You Stop Smoking Right Now?” in a tweet: More »

10 Health Issues the U.S. Government Wants You to Worry About In April

10 Health Issues the U.S. Government Wants You to Worry About In April

I have to admit that I’m skeptical of the whole concept of monthly national health observances from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Now, I’m not a total crank – I think it’s important for health organizations to organize and publicize their messaging, works, and research, but when every single month on the calendar is jam-packed with health issues and conditions that we’re supposed to learn about, care about, and/or donate to, the over-saturation point comes quickly – like donor fatigue after Christmastime. But it is spring and the start of a new month, and there’s nothing wrong with being informed. (Though, do you really have the time or brain space to be over-informed about issues that may not affect you? We don’t.) So, as I fight off health issue awareness fatigue, here are ten health conditions that we’re officially supposed to be aware of during April 2011, and why you may or may not need to spend the next almost 30 days caring about them: More »

April Fool’s Day Is Good for Your Health – Unless You Have a Heart Attack

April Fool's Day Is Good for Your Health â Unless You Have a Heart Attack

Yesterday, Fox News’ website ran a post that claimed April Fool’s Day is good for your heart, and cited studies indicating that laughter reduces stress hormones, may help reduce blood pressure, and may even potentially help prevent a heart attack or stroke. That’s all well and good if your April Fool’s Day prank (or the one someone plays on you) actually makes you laugh, but what if instead the ruse scares the crap out of you, so much so that you have a heart attack out of sheer fright and terror? Then, not so good for your health.

In my experience, April Fool’s Day is less about laughing than it is about trying really hard to fake out and potentially terrify the other person or people, however briefly. A few of my innocent past April Fool’s pranks have included telling people I eloped with someone I barely knew, telling people I was pregnant, telling people I’d been kicked out of school, telling people I’d joined the military, telling people I was moving to Mongolia the following week, telling people I’d been offered a recurring role on a soap opera, et cetera. Sure, the laughs came later, but the real electric charge came from the period of time when the other (gullible) person or people actually bought your story and were fooled into a sudden state of total shock and surprise. More »

NYC Health Department’s New Anti-Smoking Ads Are a Waste of Money

NYC Health Department's New Anti-Smoking Ads Are a Waste of Money

If you live anywhere around New York City, or have visited the area recently, you may have seen these new anti-smoking commercials that are part of the New York City Health Department’s campaign called: NYC Quits! Obviously, the ads are meant to shock and disturb us (and our loved ones) into never touching another cigarette again. And they sure as hell are shocking and disturbing. (Keep reading to watch videos of both.) So much so, that as soon as these emphysema sufferers and stroke victims come on the air, both my husband and I reach for the remote to hit the mute button or change the channel. Not because we’re callous human beings, but because we’re both lifelong non-smokers, so we’re not the target audience anyway. (Doubtless the NYC Health Department and its ad agency would be disappointed to hear this.) But I can’t help but wonder, who is the target audience? More »

Morning Links: Drinking Coffee May Reduce Women’s Stroke Risk

Morning Links: Drinking Coffee May Reduce Women's Stroke Risk

Drink Joe to Stave Off Stroke – Drinking soda might increase your risk for stroke, but it’s probably not the caffeine: A new study shows that drinking coffee could reduce stroke risk in women. (TIME)

Supplements for Depression – Find out which supplements could cure the blues, and which are just a waste of money. (Huffington Post)

How to Eat Green – Check out nine eco-friendly diets for your health and the environment. (Mother Nature Network) More »