Topic: self-improvement

How To Throw a Great Dinner Party (Mistakes, Disasters, and Recipe Fails Included)

How To Throw a Great Dinner Party (Mistakes, Disasters, and Recipe Fails Included)

I’ll be the first to admit that I’m not particularly gifted in the kitchen. But it isn’t because I’m too busy or not interesting in making homemade, healthy food–it’s because I know there are other people who can cook and bake better and with fewer mistakes than I can. I’m intimidated by kitchen failure. So most often, I just don’t try. That’s where former television news anchor and personality Erika Monroe-Williams, who blogs as The Hopeless Housewife, and I differ. I’m afraid of mistakes–she just laughs them off, and encourages others to do the same. More »

How White Water Rafting Helped Me Face My Fears (And Re-Ignite My Inner Bad-Ass)

How White Water Rafting Helped Me Face My Fears (And Re-Ignite My Inner Bad-Ass)

Becoming a powerlifter taught me to be fearless. Then a serious injury from lifting, followed by surgery and the loss of my beloved sport taught me to respect my own limits. One of the most painful parts of the experience was losing that bad-ass sense that I could do anything; after all, I got hurt precisely because I didn’t think it could happen. More »

“Smart Drugs” Primer: 4 Lesser-Known Nootropics To Boost Your Brainpower

"Smart Drugs" Primer: 4 Lesser-Known Nootropics To Boost  Your Brainpower

It’s “Transhuman Week” this week at the Wired UK website, with writers exploring “the ethical, medical and social issues associated with using technology to enhance the human body and mind.” You should probably go to Wired and check out the whole series (do you really want to be left behind when we all start becoming “limitless” superhumans? I didn’t think so) but to get you started, here’s a little primer on one of my favorite forms of The Future Is Now: Nootropics, aka “smart drugs.” More »

Bill Clinton Is Trying To Stay Sane, So He Hires Buddhist Monk Of Course

Bill Clinton Is Trying To Stay Sane, So He Hires Buddhist Monk Of Course

His wife may be busy taking body-snarking jabs from the media about her weight and her lack of make-up (gasp!), but instead of rushing to her rescue, Bill Clinton is busy meditating. In fact, the former president has hired himself a Buddhist monk to help him relax and forget all about those nasty media folks (who weren’t so kind to him either, back in the day). More »

Women Are The Biggest Victors Of The Olympics In 2012

Women Are The Biggest Victors Of The Olympics In 2012

The Olympics 2012 have only just begun; it’s too soon to tell if we’ll remember this as the year that Chinese swimmers rose (or doped) to become the world’s best, the year that unpopular new rules muscled Jordyn Weiber out of her place in the gymnastics all-around, or some other incredible moment that we have yet to announce. But whatever star moments emerge, and whoever takes home the most gold, it’s already clear: Women are the biggest winners in London this year, no matter how they perform (or tweet). More »

10 Things to Do Before Summer is Over, Done and Gone, Gone, Gone

10 Things to Do Before Summer is Over, Done and Gone, Gone, Gone

Sad news to report: Summer is half over. I’m certain many of you have been slacking off on your farmer’s tan and barefoot beach walking. If you’re like me you still haven’t tried out that low-cal popsicle recipe you tore out of Family Circle while waiting at your dentist’s office. Sadly, before we all know it, we’ll be itching our way to Christmas in boiled wool sweaters. More »

How Much Weight Will You Gain If You Quit Smoking? 10 Pounds, On Average

How Much Weight Will You Gain If You Quit Smoking? 10 Pounds, On Average

“How much weight will I gain if I quit smoking?” is a question many women ask when they’re contemplating their last cigarette, and according to French and British researchers, quitters who don’t use any supplements or quitting aids gain an average of ten pounds in the first 12 months after they quit. That’s not only higher than the standard answer given (most quitting lit cites a figure around six pounds) but it’s also twice the amount that many female smokers say they’d be comfortable gaining. But researchers still emphasize that, even considering the health risks associated with weight gain, quitting is the better choice, and that the data doesn’t necessarily mean you’ll gain that much weight. More »

How To Plan The Best Summer You’ve Ever Had

How To Plan The Best Summer You've Ever Had

Summer starts off with waves of opportunity—mind-clearing vacations, stress-reducing outdoor yoga—but often the season fades before we’ve even had time to take advantage of its promises.

Beachy bliss won’t always just present itself on your Hamptons doorstep, says Laurie Gerber, life coach extraordinaire and president of Handel Group Life Coaching. You need a blueprint to achieve your summer goals. More »

2 Tiny Habits That Can Improve Your Overall Health

2 Tiny Habits That Can Improve Your Overall Health

Apples and television: Those are the two small things that researchers say could make a huge difference to your overall health, if you’re trying to make the same kinds of improvements that most Americans work at year in and year out. A new study from Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine found that, for subjects trying to change bad habits like consuming too much saturated fat, not eating enough fruit and vegetables, being too sedentary, and not getting enough exercise, starting with a couple of small habits was actually more effective than trying to change it all. So they say start with an apple (and less television) a day. More »

Health and Hygiene Advice From 1919

Health and Hygiene Advice From 1919

At the thrift store this weekend, I picked up a copy of a book from 1919 called Hygiene And Health, written by Indiana college professors Charles P. Emerson and George Herbert Betts. The book is aimed at elementary school kids, so we are not quite the intended audience. Nonetheless, I think you all might enjoy some pearls of health wisdom from 1919. Click through for how often to eat each of the great groups of food (that would be “milk, eggs, cereal grains, vegetables, fruits, meats, sweets and pure water,” obviously); why our food should be “palatable” and our meal times “cheerful;” bad habits to avoid with your hair; and why to avoid iced drinks at soda fountains between meals. More »

What ‘Eating Mindfully’ Really Means (And How To Do It)

What 'Eating Mindfully' Really Means (And How To Do It)

Ten years ago, Dr. Susan Albers published the first edition of Eating Mindfully, an alternative to fad diets and restrictive eating plans, that emphasized the examination and enjoyment of food as fuel for the body. Now, the frequent Huffington Post and Psychology Today contributor has updated the book with frequently-asked questions, tips, and eating exercises to take help readers break the hand-to-mouth habit that our busy lives often seem to mandate. More »